HEAL UoS

Posts Tagged ‘Modern Law Review’

HEAL Workshop 2012: Hidden Lawmakers in Health Care Law

In 2012, Meetings, Testing project on September 17, 2012 at 5:00 am

Today and tomorrow (17-18 Sept) we are hosting the second HEAL workshop on Hidden Lawmakers in Health Care Law. Previous posts on this research project can be found here and here.

Health Care Law is a relatively new legal discipline that until recently has been developed significantly through litigation. In recent years it has become apparent that the process by which cases come to be litigated may be less haphazard than at first appears. We are seeking to instigate discussion and further investigation of the role of such ‘test’ cases in developing the substance of Health Care Law.

Drawing on contributions to a two day seminar in 2011, funded by the Modern Law Review, a number of different categories of hidden lawmakers have been identified. This seminar seeks to take that work further in relation to a category of hidden lawmakers that emerged from the seminar and related discussions as requiring further study and consideration. It concerns those who intervene in matters that have come before the courts, to seek to influence the outcomes of the cases. It will bring together a group of invited participants including academics, clinical and legal practitioners, members of interest groups, and participants in influential cases to discuss and debate key aspects of the litigation process, and provide a sounding board for further exploration. The seminar will involve presentations by key participants combined with round table debates and discussions, both formal and informal, amongst the delegates.

Speakers include: Ann Furedi, BPAS; Josephine Quintavalle, CORE; David Lock, QC, No5 Chambers; Prof Rachael Mulheron, Queen Mary, University of London; Prof Laurence Lustgarten, Visiting Fellow, ELAC, University of Oxford and Prof Jonathan Montgomery, University of Southampton. Further details can be found here.

 

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HIDDEN LAW-MAKERS Law School Seminar

In 2011, Testing project on November 15, 2011 at 5:55 pm

In a seminar on 2 November 2011 Jonathan Montgomery, Caroline Jones, and Hazel Biggs identified two different aspects of law-making that needed to be examined. The first was descriptive – how law is made. The second was normative – the framework within which to critique law making process & judge the legitimacy of laws. In relation to the first, some law making was highly visible (e.g. by Parliament and the judiciary), some was traceable in documents such as soft law (codes of practice and guidance), but others such as settlement cultures and legal advice that influenced norms of practice was not.

There was an expected process for the production of legislation through green and white papers, possibly supplements be consultations (e.g. in relation to the legislation governing human fertilisation and embryology). A framework for critique has been developed by Caroline Jones to consider the transition between consultations and Government responses. Judicial decision making has been widely studied. The orthodox account of judicial defence to Parliament, as offered by Lord Browne-Wilkinson in the Bland decision, is known to be disingenuous and theories of adjudication (such as those offered by Ronald Dworkin) have tried to provide a normative defence of judges’ work. It is far from clear, however, that they have adequately addressed the how judges choose to take expansive or narrow approaches to the cases before them, leaving some aspects of judicial law-making substantially hidden.

In relation to ‘intermediate authorities’ (such as the GMC or HFEA) entrusted with developing guidance both the description of the ‘law making’ processes and the appropriate normative principles are under-developed. It is even less clear how one should assess the significance of those who bring cases to court with a view to changing the law. Does it matter how personal their interest is? What questions need to be asked about legitimacy or representative authority of litigants in cases such as those brought by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS v DH [2011] EWHC 235 (Admin))or Bruno Quintavalle on behalf of the Pro-Life Alliance and Josephine Quintavalle of Comment on Reproductive Ethics where a particular policy stance is being promoted?

This seminar explored some of the learning from our seminar in May 2011, funded by the Modern Law Review, and is part of our work developing a paper for publication.

Hidden Lawmakers

In 2011, Meetings, Testing project on November 2, 2011 at 7:02 am

Following last week’s fascinating seminar with Sarah Barclay (more on that soon in another post), today we have a Law staff seminar exploring some of our theorisation of ‘hidden lawmakers’ in the context of Health Care Law. The notion of hidden law-makers was one of the key themes explored in our two-day conference earlier this year, generously sponsored by the Modern Law Review.

The seminar will run from 1pm in the staff room on level 2 in the Law building.