HEAL UoS

Posts Tagged ‘ethics’

Southampton event: “Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics II: Identity and Persistence”, 18 Sept., 2015

In 2015, Meetings, Reproduction on August 31, 2015 at 9:17 am

“Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics II: Identity and Persistence”, 18 September, University of Southampton, UK.

SPEAKERS & TITLES
Steinvor Arnadottir (Stirling): ‘On the Metaphysical Implications of the Part-Whole View.
Lynne Baker (Amherst): ‘A Puzzle about Pregnancy: first there is one person, then there are two.’
Victoria Browne (Oxford Brookes): ‘Aristotelean Teleology and the Philosophy of Pregnancy Loss’
Elselijn Kingma
(Southampton): ‘Budding Humans? Pregnancy & Identity’

DESCRIPTION
Although philosophers have explored metaphysical questions related to pregnancy – most obviously abortion and the metaphysical status of the fetus – little philosophical attention has been paid to pregnancy itself. That is a remarkable omission because pregnancy raises important philosophical problems in metaphysics, ethics and epistemology: should the foetus be regarded as part of or ‘merely surrounded by’ the mother? If persons can be parts of other persons, what does this imply for bodily ownership and personal and numerical identity? What special rights and duties does the unique status of pregnancy bestow? Does the radically transformative character of pregnancy mean that those who have never been pregnant are excluded from certain kinds of knowledge about pregnancy and its consequences? This workshop explores the implications of pregnancy for personal identity and personal ontology.


This workshop is one of a series of four in the project Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics, Ethics & Epistemology, funded by the Southampton Ethics Centre and the University of Southampton ‘Adventures in Research’ Scheme, with added support from the British Society for Philosophy of Science and the Aristotelian Society. It was preceded by another workshop on Metaphysics, on ‘the foetus and the maternal organism’ on the 21st of July, and, prior to that, two workshops on Ethics and Epistemology on the 18th of June 2014 and the 13th of April 2015. 

REGISTRATION
Registration is free of charge, and will include tea/coffee/refreshments. Delegates must provide/ pay for their own meals; there is an option to sign up for a buffet lunch (cost: GBP 8.50) when registering via the online store:http://go.soton.ac.uk/6go
Please register by September 10th. If you would like to attend but childcare duties render your attendance difficult, please contact the organisers (as far in advance as possible).

MORE INFORMATION
For more information, program, accessibility information & registration, see this page.

Dr Elselijn Kingma and Dr Fiona Woollard
Philosophy
School of Humanities
University of Southampton

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HEAL member publication: ETHICS, EMBRYOS, AND EVIDENCE: A LOOK BACK AT WARNOCK

In 2015, Bioethics, Gratuitous self-promotion, Publications, Reproduction on August 10, 2015 at 9:14 am

We’re delighted to flag up that Dr Natasha Hammond-Browning’s article on ‘ETHICS, EMBRYOS, AND EVIDENCE: A LOOK BACK AT WARNOCK’ has been accepted for publication in Medical Law Review, and was published online on August 1st, 2015. The article can be accessed here (subscription required).

Abstract
The Report of the Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology, the Warnock Report, forms the basis of the UK legislation on embryo research, and its influence continues to be felt, even though over 30 years have passed since its publication. The Warnock Committee was the first of its kind to consider how advancements in human fertilisation and embryology should be regulated. This article examines the evidence submitted to the Warnock Committee, upon which its members ultimately reached their conclusions. With ongoing debate as to the status of the human embryo, it is important to recognise that the legislative position is one that was reached after extensive consultation and consideration of submitted evidence by the Warnock Committee. This article considers the differing ethical viewpoints that were expressed by organisations both prior and post-publication of the Warnock Report, and how the Committee used that evidence to reach their conclusions, and ultimately calls for a new Warnock-style committee.

Southampton event: “Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics I: The Foetus and the Maternal Organism”, 21 July 2015

In 2015, Bioethics, Events, Reproduction on July 10, 2015 at 1:50 pm

Elselijn Kingma and Fiona Woollard are running a research project ‘Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics, Ethics and Epistemology” – the third in a series of four workshops is being hosted this month.

Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics I: The Foetus and the Maternal Organism 21 July, University of Southampton, UK.

SPEAKERS & TITLES
Eric Olson (Sheffield): ‘Is the foetus a part of the mother’s body?’
John Dupre (Exeter): ‘Pregnancy as a bifurcating process’
Rohan Lewis (Souhtampton): ‘No going back: biological perspectives on the emergence of biological identity in reproduction’
Barry Smith (Buffalo): ‘Embryontology’

DESCRIPTION
Although philosophers have explored metaphysical questions related to pregnancy – most obviously abortion and the metaphysical status of the fetus – little philosophical attention has been paid to pregnancy itself. This workshop explores on of the main metaphysical questions posed by pregnancy: how do the entities involved in pregnancy – the embryo or fetus and the maternal organism relate to each other? Should the fetus be regarded as part of the mother, or as ‘merely inside ‘ or ‘surrounded by’ the mother?

This workshop is one of a series of four in the project Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics, Ethics & Epistemology, funded by the Southampton Ethics Centre and the University of Southampton ‘Adventures in Research’ Scheme, with added support from the British Society for Philosophy of Science and the Aristotelian Society. It will be followed by another workshops on Metaphysics on the 18th of September and was preceded by two workshops on Ethics and Epistemology on the 18th of June 2014 and the 13th of April 2015.

REGISTRATION
Registration is free of charge, and will include tea/coffee/refreshments. Delegates must provide/pay for their own meals; there is an option to sign up for a buffet lunch (cost: GBP 8.50) when registering via the online store.
Please register by July 12th. If you would like to attend but childcare duties render your attendance difficult, please contact the organisers (as far in advance as possible).

MORE INFORMATION
For more information, program, accessibility information & registration, see here.

Southampton Event: Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Ethics II (April 13)

In 2015, Bioethics, Meetings, Reproduction on March 16, 2015 at 9:08 am

We’re delighted to spread the word re the forthcoming event on “Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Ethics and Epistemology Workshop II”, to be hosted at Avenue Campus, University of Southampton, on April 13th, 2015.

The speakers are Rebecca Kukla (Georgetown), Sally Fischer (Warren-Wilson), Lindsey Porter (Sheffield), and Fiona Woollard (Southampton).

DESCRIPTION
In applied ethics, much has been written in relation to pregnancy – based either on a conception of pregnancy as the ‘hosting of a stranger’, or focusing on the rights of the foetus whilst disregarding that foetus’s existence as intertwined with that of its mother. Neither of these two approaches takes the unique physical, relation and transformative state of pregnancy seriously. Pregnancy also raises epistemological issues. Does the radically transformative character of pregnancy mean that those who have never been pregnant are excluded from certain kinds of knowledge about pregnancy and its consequences? And are pregnant women taken seriously now as knowers and testifiers? These epistemological issues have important implications for the appropriate way to approach the ethical debate.

This workshop is one of a series of four in the project Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics, funded by the Southampton Ethics Centre and the University of Southampton ‘Adventures in Research’ Scheme. It will be followed by two workshops on Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Metaphysics and was preceded by a workshop on Taking Pregnancy Seriously in Ethics and Epistemology on the 18th of June 2014.

REGISTRATION
For more information, program, abstracts and registration: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/philosophy/news/events/2015/04/13-pregnancy-workshop.page.

Registration is free of charge, and will include tea/coffee/refreshments. Delegates must provide/ pay for their own meals; there is an option to sign up for a buffet lunch (cost: GBP 8.50) when registering via the online store: http://go.soton.ac.uk/6ce

Please register by April 1st. If you would like to attend but childcare duties render your attendance difficult, please contact the organisers (as far in advance as possible).

Elselijn Kingma, Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Southampton
e.m.kingma@soton.ac.uk

Ethics, Politics, and Georgetown Public Health Law

In 2014, Gratuitous self-promotion, Public Ethics on February 10, 2014 at 11:42 am

Last week I was delighted to visit Georgetown University. In particular, it was a great pleasure to meet up with Larry Gostin in the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Larry’s work has been crucial in shaping contemporary understandings of public health law and ethics; my main areas of research. It was fantastic to have the opportunity to discuss with him my own teaching and research agendas, including the work that A.M. Viens and I are up to in HEAL developing specialist teaching in Public Health, Law, and Ethics for Southampton’s new MSc in Public Health.

The primary reason for my visit was to give an invited lecture to JD and LLM students studying public health law in Georgetown Law. The lecture was entitled “Political Theory in Public Health Ethics”. In part, it involved teaching some of the fundamentals (at least as I see them!) in bringing ethical analysis to public health practice and policy. However, my main aim was to challenge the students to consider not just the nature, but also the scope, of normative claims made in the name of public health. Having examined the necessary relationships between public health and law, I invited the students to think about two distinct modes of ‘doing’ public health ethics.

In relation to the first, we studied the work of scholars who are interested in theorising: we looked at ideas concerning conceptual coherence, normative and analytical rigour, and theoretical bounds (or lack of them) to claims made in public health ethics. The lecture surveyed some of the many different ethical theories that are brought to bear on public health, and scrutinised their bases and conclusions. As regards the second, we looked at ethics in public advocacy, referring to ideas such as ‘nudge’, ‘stewardship’, and the human right to health. Here we asked not just how robust these positions are in theory, but how robust we really want or need them to be in practice.

My hope with the class was that the students would address the very basics of whatever motivates their ideas about good practice in public health law and policy; to think about what makes health promotion desirable, or even an imperative (and what brakes there ought to be on health promotion). But I also hope that it left them thinking about the potentially distinguishable roles of academic and activist, and which (neither, either, or both) they would wish to assume, and on what terms.

John Coggon

Ethics in a complex world

In 2012, News on April 30, 2012 at 8:23 am

The HEAL team members (Hazel, Jonathan and Caroline)  are excited to be involved in a new Curriculum Innovation Programme module to be offered in 2012/13: ‘Ethics in a complex world’, enthusiastically led by Dr Julie Wintrup from Health Sciences, and joined by Prof Roger Ingham, Dr Angela Fenwick, Dr Alex Furr and Fiona Harvey – with news of further colleagues joining the team to be confirmed later this year!

         

For more information check us out here & on YouTube.   

Case of the week: September 22, 2000

In Case of the week, Cases 2000, Death and dying on September 19, 2011 at 8:46 am

Re A (Children) EWCA Civ, Sept 22, 2000.  

The twins, named Jodie and Mary in the reports in order to preserve their anonymity, were born on August 8, 2000 in Manchester, after their parents travelled to the UK from Gozo, Malta (as it was known they were expecting conjoined twins and local resources were limited). They were joined at the lower abdomen/pelvis and – crucially – shared an aorta. Whilst Jodie was reported to have an ‘anatomically normal brain, heart, lungs and liver’, showing normal reactions to stimuli etc [para 6, CA transcript, below], Mary was reported to have a ‘primitive brain’, poorly functioning heart, and an absence of ‘functioning lung tissue’ [at 7], and was therefore dependent on Jodie for survival. The surgical team and hospital were in favour of surgical separation in order to maximise the chances of Jodie’s survival; the pressure placed on her heart in supporting both her and Mary was, according to expert evidence, highly likely to lead to the premature deaths of both children, whereas separation might enable Jodie to survive, albeit it that it would concurrently lead to Mary’s immediate death.

The parents disagreed, noting the influence of their devout religious faith (Roman Catholic) that it should be ‘God’s will’ to decide whether or not either or both of the children should survive. The hospital sought, and was granted, a declaration that the operation might go ahead – it was granted by Johnson J on 25 August 2000. The parents’ appeal was, a month later, dismissed by a unanimous Court of Appeal panel, comprised of Ward LJ, Brooke LJ and Robert Walker LJ. Unsurprisingly this case raised a plethora of legal and ethical/moral dilemmas for the court including – but not exhaustively – the role of parents in decision-making; questions over comparative ‘quality of life’ issues; welfare/best interests; murder, intention & the doctrine of necessity (in defence); role of religion; relevant aspects and intersections of Family Law and Criminal Law; & the sanctity of life (including some comments on the (then) forthcoming Human Rights Act 1998. However, the unanimity of the agreed outcome masks the divergent routes by which the individual judges arrived at their decisions.

For those who wish to read further, the case transcript is freely available to all via  BAILII:  http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2000/254.html. Permission to appeal to the House of Lords was granted, but the parents chose not to appeal – nor was a direct application to Strasbourg (ie an alternative route to challenge the decision) undertaken.

Links

Coverage of the CA decision: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/937586.stm  

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2000/sep/28/4?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

Coverage of reactions to the decision: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/937377.stm

This decision is also reported at [2001] Fam 147, [2000] 4 All ER 961, [2001] 2 WLR 480, [2000] 3 FCR 577, [2001] 1 FLR 1, [2001] Fam Law 18, 57 BMLR 1; but access to these resources may be restricted (subscription required).

Looking back five years: egg donation for research

In 2006, Reproduction on September 1, 2011 at 3:01 am

In September 2006 the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority launched a consultation, ‘Donating eggs for research: safeguarding donors’, asking whether or not egg donation for research purposes should be permissible, and if so, how could donors be best protected?

For a brief overview of the consultation, see this Bionews commentary: http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_12842.asp; and for a summary of the BMA’s Medical Ethics Committee’s views, see Veronica English’s follow up piece: http://www.bionews.org.uk/page_37900.asp.

In February 2007, the HFEA announced its decision to permit ‘altruistic’ donation for research purposes – see the Report.

Welcome to the HEAL UoS blog!

In Welcome on September 1, 2011 at 3:00 am

As it says in the ‘About‘ section, HEAL UoS ~ the Health Ethics and Law research group at the University of Southampton ~ was established in 2005 through the efforts of Prof. Jonathan Montgomery and Dr. Caroline Jones. We were delighted to have Prof. Hazel Biggs join us in 2009. Together the three of us run the network, arranging lunchtime seminars on topical subjects & occasional workshops, and liaising with colleagues and peers to discuss and coordinate responses to public consultations in the field of Health Care Ethics and Law, broadly conceived. We try to both foster and further develop collaborative relationships across the University and local NHS community.

This blog …

Our aim is to update this blog at least once weekly with posts under the historical ‘case of the week’ section (going on the dates of judgments – so we can’t promise a case every week!), policy developments and ‘in the news’ stories, both current and historical, and ‘events’ to keep you up-to-date with HEAL UoS’s activities. You can also follow us on Twitter:  @HEALUoS

nb. This blog does not contain legal advice, nor does it seek to provide such guidance – if you need legal advice and assistance please contact a qualified solicitor, and/or your union (if relevant) or local CAB office.