HEAL UoS

Posts Tagged ‘death’

Today’s HEAL meeting : discussing choice at the end of life

In 2012, Death and dying on October 23, 2012 at 3:42 pm

The next HEAL event will be on Tuesday 23 October from 4.30pm in rm 2055/building 4 (Law), led by Hazel Biggs, on the Safeguarding Choice consultation http://www.appg-endoflifechoice.org.uk/pdf/appg-safeguarding-choice.pdf. The consultation – which closes on 20 Nov – is being run by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life in partnership with Dignity in Dying, and includes a draft Bill (‘applying’ only to England and Wales).

HEAL’s next meeting: 22 February 2012

In 2012, Death and dying, Meetings on February 17, 2012 at 8:32 am

HEAL’s next meeting will be on Wednesday February 22, 2012, at 1pm in 4/2007, where Hazel Biggs will lead a seminar on ‘The Death Commission’, drawing on the recent Report by the Commission on Assisted Dying. This is a follow up event to last year’s HEAL seminar on the parameters of the Commission’s consultation paper, led by Hazel Biggs, Jonathan Montgomery and Caroline Jones.

Life, Death & Law Making

In Death and dying, Testing project on September 22, 2011 at 2:04 pm

Now available on-line before the published issue: Jonathan Montgomery, ‘Guarding the gates of St. Peter: life, death and law-making’, Legal Studies journal.

Abstract   In 2009 the legislature, judges and Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) each turned their attention to issues around assisted suicide. The legislature decided not to change the law. The judges decided the existing law was insufficiently clear and required the Director to clarify it. The Director flirted with reforming the law, but then drew back from such a legislative role. His published prosecution policy has been considered as a contribution to the regulation of death and dying, and as such has been found wanting. However, considered in the context of the proper roles of Parliament, courts and prosecutors, and seen as an exercise in constitutional restraint, the Director’s approach should be appraised rather differently. From this perspective, the decision of the Judicial Committee of the House of Lords in R (Purdy) v DPP1 raises significant concerns for the legitimacy of decision making in the contested moral issues that arise in healthcare ethics. In our democracy, courts should be wary of usurping legislative authority in areas where the Parliamentary position is clear. They should be reluctant to take sides in the protracted war over access to a ‘good death’.