HEAL UoS

Posts Tagged ‘contraception’

Injecting contraception in schools?

In 2012, News, Reproduction, Testing project on November 6, 2012 at 9:00 am

This is a guest post by Emma Nottingham.

The Daily Telegraph has conducted a survey which revealed that contraceptive injections are being offered in a range of schools across the UK in including Bristol, Northumbria, Peterborough, CountyDurham, the West Midlands and Berkshire. The front page story has expressed concern that school girls as young as thirteen are being given the contraceptive injection at school, without their parents’ knowledge. Statistics revealed that school nurses have given the contraceptive jab or implant to girls between the ages of 13 and 16 more than 900 times in the last two years. The medical profession, including school nurses are bound by rules on confidentiality.

Outrage was expressed by parents in Southampton earlier this year after finding out that children were being given the contraceptive implant in schools without their consent, as part of a wider government initiative to reduce the number of teenage pregnancies. The contraceptive implant works to prevent pregnancy by releasing the hormone progesterone into the bloodstream from a 4cm rod which is inserted into the arm and is effective for up to three years. The contraceptive injection is effective for three months.

The issue of under-16 year olds’ competency to consent to contraceptive advice and treatment without parental consent was settled in the case of Gillick v Wisbech and West Norfolk Health Authority and another [1985] 3 All ER 402, after Victoria Gillick took legal action against the Department of Health and Social Security in response to their 1980 circular on family planning which endorsed confidential contraceptive advice and treatment for under-16 year olds.

Despite the legal settlement of this issue 27 years ago, under-16 year olds’ access to contraceptive treatment without parental consent remains controversial, particularly in light of the advancement in medical technology which offers a wider variety of treatments to females, such as the implant and contraceptive injection, which were not available at the time of Gillick.

 

Southampton’s ‘Gillick’?

In 2012, Reproduction, Testing project on February 27, 2012 at 9:37 pm

Just a quick post: Earlier this month news ‘broke’ of young women being offered contraceptive advice and services in Southampton, prompting comment in the local media. This evening, an interview with Prof. Roger Ingham, Director of the Centre for Sexual Health Research, was shown on the BBC One programme Inside Out South, in a section of the programme dedicated to this story (first 5 mins of the programme, available on iPlayer for the next week). Such debates are, of course, not new – see GillickThe Government has announced plans to publish a new sexual health policy document in 2012, but whether either its publication or the concerns of parents will lead to further legal challenges remains to be seen.