HEAL UoS

Honouring the Contributions of a Founder of Medical Law

In 2015, Conferences, Uncategorized on December 14, 2015 at 9:29 am

Prof. John Coggon

On Friday 4th December, Hazel Biggs, David Gurnham, and I attended a meeting arranged at the University of Manchester to honour the contribution that Margot Brazier has made to the field of Medical Law. It is hard to describe in full enough terms the impact that Margot has had on legal scholarship, understanding, and practice. And even if we limit ourselves to the major area of study that she has pioneered—medical law—it is hard to capture quite how much she has given.

Margot is the quintessential scholar. She excels in her research, as a teacher, and as a figure engaged in significant questions of public ethics and policy. Just consider the research interests of each of HEAL’s core members in the Law School—Hazel Biggs, John Coggon, David Gurnham, Caroline Jones, Natasha Hammond-Browning, Claire Lougarre, Remigius Nwabueze, and A.M. Viens. Not one of us works in a field to which Margot has not offered significant insights and understanding. To repeat a term already used, she is a true pioneer: as was recognised both on the day, and in a festschrift that has been published in her honour.

The conference was a fantastic tribute to Margot’s great work. Hazel was amongst those speaking, but all who attended were able to attest to how much we owe Margot. Lady Hale’s foreword to the festschrift, which was the basis of her speech at the conference, provides in duly flattering terms the essence of what it is that has led to Margot inspiring, encouraging, supporting, mentoring, and advising so many of us in the field. She is a fantastic scholar, whose work—and approach to life—is founded on an uncompromising and deep-seated humanity.

As a whole research centre, we at HEAL are delighted to report our participation in this landmark event, and to thank Margot more than wholeheartedly for having helped define this field of study: I am sure it is fair to say that at least I, if not others in the Centre, would not be here without Margot.

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