HEAL UoS

Archive for November, 2015|Monthly archive page

HEAL Seminar Series: 4-5pm Wednesday 9 December 2015, with Matteo Bonotti speaking on ‘Food Policy, Nutritionism and Public Justification’

In 2015, Meetings on November 30, 2015 at 9:13 am

On Wednesday 9 December 2015 we will host the fifth session in the 2015-16 HEAL seminar series, with Matteo Bonotti, a Lecturer in Political Theory at Cardiff University, speaking on ‘Food Policy, Nutritionism and Public Justification’. The seminar will run from 4-5pm in room 2007/4 (Law). All welcome.

Abstract
In this paper I critically assess the nutritionist approach to food that underlies health-promoting food policies such as nudges, fat taxes and food bans. My central contention is that nutritionism is a controversial conception of the good which is not suitable for justifying health-promoting food policies in societies characterized by reasonable pluralism with regard to food and health. In the first part of the paper I illustrate the main features of nutritionism and critically assess its flaws in relation to the problem of public justification. In the second part of the paper I show how nudges, fat taxes and food bans are illegitimate since the rationale for them is ultimately grounded in nutritionism. I conclude by offering suggestions for alternative health-promoting food policies which can be publicly justified in view of the fact of reasonable pluralism.

Advertisements

HEAL Seminar Series: 4-5pm Wednesday 25 November 2015, with Jack Clayton Thompson speaking on ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want: A Gewirthian Model Of Rational Autonomy In Abortion’.

In 2015, Meetings on November 16, 2015 at 9:00 am

On Wednesday 25 November 2015 we have the fourth session in the 2015/16 HEAL seminar series, with Jack Clayton Thompson, a lecturer in Law at the University of Westminster, speaking on ‘You Can’t Always Get What You Want: A Gewirthian Model Of Rational Autonomy In Abortion’. The seminar will run from 4-5pm in room 2007/4 (Law). All welcome.

Abstract

The law regulating the availability of abortion is problematic both legally and morally. It is dogmatic in its requirements of women and doctors and ignorant of would-be fathers. Practically, its usage is liberal – with s1(1)(a) Abortion Act 1967 treated as a ‘catch all’ ground – it allows abortion on demand. Yet this is not reflected in the ‘law’. Against this outdated legislation I propose a model of autonomy which seeks to tether our moral concerns with a new legal approach to abortion. I do so by maintaining that a legal conception of autonomy is derivable from the categorical imperative resulting from Gewirth’s argument to the Principle of Generic Consistency: Act in accordance with the generic rights of your recipients as well as of yourself. This model of Gewirthian Rational Autonomy, I suggest, provides a guide for both public and private notions of autonomy and how our autonomous interests can be balanced across social structures in order to legitimately empower choice. I claim, ultimately, that relevant rights in the context of abortion are derivable from this model.

Global Health Law: Health, Governance, and Justice

In 2015, Gratuitous self-promotion, Publications on November 9, 2015 at 9:20 am

One of the core areas of research activity within HEAL, led by me and A.M. Viens, is Public Health Ethics and Law. As a field, this embraces a huge range of issues. Some of our work is driven by particular practical areas of focus, such as Adrian’s longstanding study of stewardship and antimicrobial resistance. Other aspects of our activity are driven by theoretical concerns, such as work I’ve done asking how the question “what makes health public?” might be answered in a transnational setting. In any instance, the bringing together of legal and philosophical analyses to big, health-related challenges is central to our activity.

I am very pleased, therefore, with the release of a special issue of Health Care Analysis that I have edited. The focal point for the issue is Lawrence O. Gostin’s highly important and influential book Global Health Law (Harvard University Press, 2014). Gostin’s work in this book sets one of the most important agendas in contemporary health, ethics, and law scholarship and practice. The journal issue advances the debate with contributions that bring perspectives from law, philosophy, and economics, with a fantastic line-up of world-leading contributors: Eric Friedman and Lawrence Gostin; Norman Daniels; Jennifer Prah Ruger; Shawn Harmon; Attiya Waris and Laila Abdul Latif; Heather Widdows; and A.M. Viens.

John Coggon

HEAL Seminar Series: 4-5pm Wednesday 11 November 2015, with Pamela Walsh speaking on ‘US Healthcare Reform: The Affordable Care Act and its Impact

In 2015, Meetings on November 6, 2015 at 8:00 am
On Wednesday 11 November 2015 we have the third in the 2015/16 HEAL seminar series, with Dr Pamela Walsh, Associate Professor at Eastern Michigan University speaking on  ‘US Healthcare Reform: The Affordable Care Act and its Impact’. The seminar will run from 4-5pm in room 4055 in building 4 (Law). All welcome.
 
 Abstract
This presentation will provide a brief overview of the United States’ Affordable Care Act that was enacted, March 2010.  This will include key components, such as the individual mandate, health insurance exchanges, employer plans, and funding. I will address political aspects, particularly the efforts by the US House of Representatives to overturn it and the rulings by the US Supreme to sustain it and the impact it has had to date.