HEAL UoS

Archive for November, 2012|Monthly archive page

Today’s HEAL meeting: John Coggon

In 2012, Meetings on November 22, 2012 at 10:36 am

Today at 3pm, Thursday 22 November, John Coggon will see speaking on ‘Elective Ventilation for Organ Donation’, in room 2055/4(Law). All welcome.

Choice at the end of life?

In 2012, Death and dying, Meetings on November 20, 2012 at 3:34 pm

On 23 October 2012 HEAL members met to discuss the All Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life/Dignity in Dying consultation. This lively and informative discussion was followed up yesterday with an impromptu ‘meeting’ to finalise our response prior to submission. Sarah Wootton and Heidi Alexander made clear in their joint Foreword the purpose of the consultation, thus:

[Their]Our consultation seeks the input of experts, stakeholders and the public on how the proposals would work in practice and what would constitute adequate safeguards. The Bill is a draft and will be reviewed and revised in light of the responses we receive to this consultation. The APPG on Choice at the End of Life and Dignity in Dying are committed to promoting greater patient choice at the end of life, particularly over where, when and how one dies. We want to work with others to ensure not only that patients at the end of life have choice and control, but also, crucially, to ensure that the safeguards work well in practice.

HEAL has responded following our discussions – as one might expect there was some agreement with the proposals, and other areas raised greater concerns. Our full response can be accessed here (scroll down to p27).

Injecting contraception in schools?

In 2012, News, Reproduction, Testing project on November 6, 2012 at 9:00 am

This is a guest post by Emma Nottingham.

The Daily Telegraph has conducted a survey which revealed that contraceptive injections are being offered in a range of schools across the UK in including Bristol, Northumbria, Peterborough, CountyDurham, the West Midlands and Berkshire. The front page story has expressed concern that school girls as young as thirteen are being given the contraceptive injection at school, without their parents’ knowledge. Statistics revealed that school nurses have given the contraceptive jab or implant to girls between the ages of 13 and 16 more than 900 times in the last two years. The medical profession, including school nurses are bound by rules on confidentiality.

Outrage was expressed by parents in Southampton earlier this year after finding out that children were being given the contraceptive implant in schools without their consent, as part of a wider government initiative to reduce the number of teenage pregnancies. The contraceptive implant works to prevent pregnancy by releasing the hormone progesterone into the bloodstream from a 4cm rod which is inserted into the arm and is effective for up to three years. The contraceptive injection is effective for three months.

The issue of under-16 year olds’ competency to consent to contraceptive advice and treatment without parental consent was settled in the case of Gillick v Wisbech and West Norfolk Health Authority and another [1985] 3 All ER 402, after Victoria Gillick took legal action against the Department of Health and Social Security in response to their 1980 circular on family planning which endorsed confidential contraceptive advice and treatment for under-16 year olds.

Despite the legal settlement of this issue 27 years ago, under-16 year olds’ access to contraceptive treatment without parental consent remains controversial, particularly in light of the advancement in medical technology which offers a wider variety of treatments to females, such as the implant and contraceptive injection, which were not available at the time of Gillick.